After lots of controversy NVIDIA finally shares RTX 2080 performance data

NVIDIA finally show their first set of benchmarking data for their upcoming Turing series of graphics cards, where we see a promising performance improvement over there the last generation GTX 1080 graphics card.

In this slide, we can clearly see double the performance improvement of RTX 2080 over the GTX 1080, though in this statement we can see the performance improvements provided by DLSS (Deep Learning Super Sampling), an upscaling technique which uses the AI processing power of Turing to deliver more detailed images. Though it is unknown if DLSS has any noticeable downsides over a native 4K pixel count, though NVIDIA states that it offers image quality that is similar to 4K with TAA enabled.

After lots of controversy NVIDIA finally shares RTX 2080 performance data

But in general, without the help of DLSS, NVIDIA’s examples showcase a 30-50% performance increase over Pascal at 4K resolutions, giving the RTX 2080 performance numbers which are similar as the GTX 1080 Ti, at least in theory. NVIDIA provided no performance data that compared between GTX 1080 Ti and The RTX 2080. It is also worth noting that NVIDIA has not released any minimum framerate data.

After lots of controversy NVIDIA finally shares RTX 2080 performance data

NVIDIA promises 4K 60Hz performance, providing several examples for steady 4K 60+ FPS gameplay, though sadly NVIDIA didn’t show any details of the graphical settings or game levels used in their internal benchmark runs. NVIDIA also offered no performance data for other graphics cards for comparison purposes.

While this data leaves a lot to be desired, the information is useful, especially when looking at the performance benefits of DLSS. The technology enables roughly 30-40% more performance than a native 4K presentation, though at this time it is unknown how the feature impacts graphics quality.

In many ways, DLSS could be compared to the resolution upscaling techniques on consoles, all of which present some form of graphical tweaking. In the future, we are anxious to see how close to a native presentation DLSS is in practice.

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